Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices involved in Harmful Health Behavior in Dembia District, northwest Ethiopia

Authors

Abstract

Abstract Background: Traditional harmful health practices such as uvulectomy, tonsillectomy, female circumcision, etc. are widely practiced in Ethiopia. These malpractices are associated with risks like massive bleeding, infection, transmission of many diseases including HIV/AIDS. Objective: To assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of the population of Dembia District towards traditional harmful health practices. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Dembia district, northwest Ethiopia, in May 2001. Data were collected from 1181 households using a pre-tested questionnaire. Results: Uvulectomy, milk teeth extraction, giving butter to a newborn baby as the first feed and cupping (venousection) were the most dominant malpractices reported by our respondents. Educational status and religion were found to be significantly associated with the attitude of respondents towards practicing the prevailing traditional malpractices of the study area ( P < .001 for each factor). Conclusion: An integrated health activity which includes the issue of traditional harmful health practice and its associated risks should be given due attention at grass roots level. The practice of the most serious traditional harmful health practices like female circumcision should be condemned. [[Ethiop.J.Health. Dev. 2002;16(2):199-207]

Published

2017-01-13

How to Cite

Alene, G. D., & Edris, M. (2017). Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices involved in Harmful Health Behavior in Dembia District, northwest Ethiopia. The Ethiopian Journal of Health Development, 16(2). Retrieved from https://ejhd.org/index.php/ejhd/article/view/768