A Research of nasal methicillin resistant/sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and pharyngeal beta-haemolytic Streptococcus carriage in midwifery students in Kahramanmaras, Eastern Mediterranean Region of Turkey

Authors

Abstract

Abstract Background: In the hospitals where hygienic conditions are not provided, nasal methicillin resistant/sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA/MSSA) colonization is seen in the hospital personnel and patients. Both the individuals’ themselves being MRSA/MSSA carriers and also other people around them are under risk and this bacterium leads to nasal colonization and then can propagate through contaminated hands and hospital materials. Objective: In this study, it was aimed to research MRSA/MSSA and beta-haemolytic streptococcus (BHS) carriage in the nose and throat flora of students of, School of Health. Methods: In the study, total of 160 midwifery students taking midwifery education was included in the research but 135 (84.4 %) out of 160 students were able to be reached. The nose and throat swab samples taken from students were examined through microbiological methods. Results: 14.1 % of students were nasal MSSA carrier. While there wasn't the nasal MRSA carrier among students attending the study in the 1st and 2nd class, 3.3 % (1 person) of the 3rd class students and 10.0 % (3 people) of the 4th class students were the nasal MRSA carrier. In addition, BHS carriage was determined in 1.5 % of students and there wasn't any difference between classes. Conclusions: These results indicate that midwifery students might have been contaminated with MSSA/MRSA during clinical practice. That MSSA/MRSA being an important pathogen is seen in midwifery students taking education in the birth units threatens the mother-child health. [Ethiop. J. Health Dev. 2010;24(1):57-60]

Published

2016-10-12

How to Cite

Kirecci, E., Ozer, A., Aral, M., & Miraloglu, M. (2016). A Research of nasal methicillin resistant/sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and pharyngeal beta-haemolytic Streptococcus carriage in midwifery students in Kahramanmaras, Eastern Mediterranean Region of Turkey. The Ethiopian Journal of Health Development, 24(1). Retrieved from https://ejhd.org/index.php/ejhd/article/view/378