SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC FACTORS INFLUENCING THE USE OF MODERN CONTRACEPTION IN AN URBAN POPULATION IN SOUTH-WESTERN ETHIOPIA

Abstract

ABSTRACT: A case-referent study to identify factors influencing the use and non-use of modern contraception was conducted in Jimma Town, a major urban center in south-western Ethiopia. Two hundred and fifty eight contraceptive users, selected from the registration books of three family planning clinics using simple random sampling techniques, were compared with age l:t-2 years) and neighbourhood (matched 258 contraceptive non-users.) The study revealed that birth place, duration of urban residence, religion, ethnic origin, number of rooms available for living and availability of radio, television and telephone do not have statistically significant association with contraceptive use (P > 0.05 in all cases). On the other hand, statistically significant association was noted between contraceptive use and marital status, educational status, occupational status, family monthly income and higher mean number of pregnancies, live births and living children. Taking a one to one ratio of male to female children of the sex composition of living children as a reference group, lack of male child is associated with a lower chance of contraceptive use (odds ratio = 0.497, p < 0.05). Among married women, higher educational and occupational status and monthly income of the spouse were also found to be associated with a higher chance of contraceptive use. In view of the several socio-demographic factors identified by the study, a multisectoral effort geared at urban disadvantaged women is recommended. [Ethiop. J. Health Dev. 1993;7(1):1-7]
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